A Digital Conversation With Author, Speaker, Podcast Host, Attorney Mentor and Educator, & High-Stakes Litigator Frank Ramos

By Larry Ebner & Frank RamosJuly 15, 2020

DRI-The Voice of the Defense Bar, published this digital conversation in the July 15, 2020 edition of The Voice newsletter.

Francisco “Frank” Ramos, Jr., is incredibly dedicated to mentoring, educating, and promoting his fellow attorneys throughout the United States and globally, and in so doing, advancing the legal profession. Frank’s service as Managing Partner at Clarke Silverglate, P.A. in Miami, where he participates in the firm’s high-end litigation practice, is just the beginning. He posts daily LinkedIn practice and business pointers for his more than 50,000 followers. He also has authored more than a dozen books, and edited others, on topics ranging from the legal process, to attorney marketing, to professional development of young lawyers, as well as published hundreds of articles for lawyers and business professionals. And Frank has recorded more than 90 podcasts in his “A Conversation With . . .” series with members of DRI-The Voice of the Defense Bar.

After Frank recently recorded  “A Conversation With . . . Larry Ebner” about my career, appellate litigation practice, and professional interests, I was anxious to reverse the flow of questions by asking Frank about his myriad activities on behalf of the defense bar and the broader legal profession.

Larry Ebner:

Frank, let’s start with the many podcasts that you have recorded with DRI members. How did you develop the idea for the podcasts?

Frank Ramos: 

Thank you Larry, for the kind words.

The birth of my DRI podcast, “A Conversation With . . .,” would be impossible to guess. When my boys, who are now in college, were younger, we’d be in the car Saturday afternoons and would listen to a podcast titled Here’s the Thing, wherein Alec Baldwin was the host. The podcast began and ended with Miles Davis’s classic, So What, which may be one of the most iconic jazz tunes from arguably the most iconic jazz album ever, Kind of Blue. Whenever the horns in So What blared in our car, I would tell my boys, both who wanted careers in music, that one day one of their tunes would be featured on a podcast. Years later I took my prediction as a promise and had my younger son, Michael, provide me the music from his original jazz tune, Leaves, and used his song for the podcast. So you see, it was never about the podcast for me. The podcast was a vehicle for my son’s music and to make a prediction into reality.

Larry Ebner:

Nonetheless, the podcasts provide many insights by a terrific and varied collection of attorneys.

You also have authored more than a dozen books, and more than 300 articles. How did you develop your writing skills, where do you get your ideas for topics, and how did you become so prolific?

Frank Ramos: 

I started writing early in my legal career to prove to myself that I actually knew a thing or two about the practice. I was suffering from imposter syndrome, and I started writing “how to” articles to see if I actually knew how to do things in the practice. Over the years, most of my writing has been process oriented—I define an issue, problem or concern, and then define the process to address it.  All of my books are basically how to or checklist types books that address everything from personal strategic planning, to leadership, to marketing, to trying a case.

Larry Ebner:

Where can I find a list of your books, most of which I understand can be downloaded for free?

Frank Ramos:  Right here—

Larry Ebner:

I know that you particularly enjoy mentoring younger attorneys. What are some of the best ways for us more senior lawyers to do that?

Frank Ramos: 

All senior lawyers should carve out time to mentor young lawyers. Mentor someone at your firm and find at least one lawyer outside your firm to mentor too. Speak with them monthly, either in person over coffee or via Zoom or by phone. It’ll help them immensely.

Larry Ebner:

I also am fascinated by your extensive use of LinkedIn. You even have written a book titled LinkedIn for Lawyers. I myself recently interviewed digital marketing consultant Nick Kosar on How Lawyers Can Use LinkedIn to Promote Their Practices. In what ways do you use LinkedIn, and how did you garner more than 50,000 LinkedIn followers?

Frank Ramos: 

I had tinkered with LinkedIn since 2007, but didn’t get serious about the platform until the fall of 2016, when DRI released my book, The Associate’s Handbook, which was my advice about the practice for young lawyers, specifically how to prepare for and try a case.  In the Fall of 2016 I decided I was going to post every day—including weekends and holidays—and except on the rare occasion, I’ve stuck to that promise.  When I started on this journey, I had about 2,000 followers.  Now I have over 51,000. Posting daily over a long period of time will get you there.

Larry Ebner:

You and I became acquainted through DRI, which has about 20,000 civil defense bar members from around the United States and internationally. In addition to serving on DRI’s Board, you have contributed to that organization and its members in many ways. How have you benefitted from your involvement with DRI, and also your prior service as President of the Florida Defense Lawyers Association?

Frank Ramos: 

I have made lifelong friends and have developed my skill set. DRI and FDLA have made me a better lawyer, better writer, better speaker, and just generally a better person.

Larry Ebner:

We haven’t yet discussed your legal practice. What does it entail?

Frank Ramos: 

My firm, Clarke Silverglate, is firm focused on high-end litigation and bet-the-company cases. I practice in the areas of product liability, commercial, and employment litigation.

Larry Ebner:

I understand that you serve as your firm’s Managing Partner.  Do you enjoy law firm management, and what trends do you see, especially in view of the pandemic?

Frank Ramos: 

I love serving as Managing Partner.  I took over from Spencer Silverglate, who now serves as the firm’s President and Chairman.  I think the pandemic taught us to embrace technology and has pushed all of us toward embracing the use of technology in our practices. That trend has been occurring for a while.  The pandemic pressed the fast forward button on that process.

Larry Ebner:

Finally, how do you and your family enjoy spending your time outside of the legal world?

Frank Ramos: 

Both our boys are in college.  Our older son, David, is graduating from Florida State University (FSU) in the fall with a degree in Music Education.  He is laying the foundation to be an orchestral conductor.  Our younger son, Michael, is a freshman at the University of Miami, where he is studying jazz performance.  Before the pandemic, my wife, Ana, and I would spend evening watching him perform at local jazz joints.

Larry Ebner:

Frank, thanks so much for participating in this digital conversation. What is the best way for readers to get in touch with you?

Frank Ramos: 

They can e-mail me at framos@cspalaw.com or follow me on LinkedIn. There, they can scroll down on my profile and download my publications for free.

Thanks so much for the opportunity, Larry.  Stay well.